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AP Classes

  • AP World Ethnic Cultural - World Ethnic Cultural Studies is the interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and origin with a focus on the experiences and perspectives of people of color within and beyond the US. Since the emergence of ethnic studies as an academic field in the 1960s, people analyze the ways in which race and racism have been, and continue to be, powerful social, cultural, and political forces and their connections to other identities, including gender, class, sexuality, and legal status.
  • AP Psychology AP Psychology is designed to introduce students to the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. To accomplish this, the course provides instruction in each of the following 14 content areas: History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Psychology, Treatment of Psychological Disorders, and Social Psychology.
  • AP United States Government  - AP Government is a semester college level course that focuses on the principles of constitutional theory and constitutional history.  It also covers institutions and processes of government and the principles and practices of the political process.  Throughout this course, students will analyze the historical ideas and events that led to our constitutional form of government, and the current events that have kept the Constitution alive.  Students will study the Constitution, the dynamics in government, and how society lives within the realm of our government structure.  A key goal is to help students develop a passionate interest in what our government does and how politics works, so they can see how much government matters in their daily lives and what they can do to participate.  As an Advanced Placement (AP) course, the curriculum is controlled by the College Board and is expected to be an entry level college course.  
  • AP World History - This course provides an overview of human history.  AP classes are designed to be at the level of a typical college­ level survey, so this class will move much faster than a typical high school world history class. We will have two primary purposes in our class; first, we will acquire an understanding of social, political, religious, intellectual, technological and economic issues and events that have shaped humanity.  Second, we will train to take the AP World History exam.We will do this by practicing multiple choice questions based on the course material and develop essay writing skills tailored to the exacting specifications of the College Board.  In the end, however, you will be developing important skills necessary to succeed in college as you examine how complex societies grew and developed over time.
  • AP US HistoryAdvanced Placement (AP) United States History is a full year survey course in American history. The course time line begins in the Pre Columbian era and concludes in the present day. The course will be taught chronologically with an emphasis placed on major themes as they unfold throughout the nation’s history. The course is designed for students who wish to take the AP exam in early May or those who wish to complete an advanced study of American history. The AP US History exam presumes at least one full academic year of college level preparation; the course will attempt to replicate that preparation. Course content is dictated by the College Board, the author of the AP exam, and will include all elements of the California state standards for 11th grade US History. 

 

  • AP SpanishThis class will apply an integrated approach to the Spanish language.  The introduction and presentation of new Spanish material, reinforcement of previously learned material, evaluation, review, exercises and activities in this class are intended to practice the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Awareness of the literature and culture in which the language is spoken will also be introduced.
  • AP Language & Composition - In this course, students will examine a writers purpose in accordance with the writers use of rhetorical devices, including tone, diction, audience, organization, appeal, style, and attitude. Students will learn how to read and evaluate primary and secondary sources and incorporate them into their compositions. Students will follow the Modern Language Association (MLA) guidelines for documenting sources. Students will write expository, analytical, and argumentative papers in response to a variety of genres. Students will read and write in the following rhetorical modes: narration, description, process analysis, example, definition, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, and argument/persuasion.

     

AP History
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AP Language